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The following is a list of the casulties of The Great War, compiled by Philip and Janet Fryer. For more details, where available, click on an individual name.

 

LONG BENNINGTON WAR MEMORIAL

NAME                         SERVICE No      REGIMENT                 DATE OF DEATH       CEMETERY           

Pte J A S Burrows          32506                 South Staffordshire            06/10/1917                Menin Rd South     

Pte H Fenton                  45050                 South Staffordshire            26/09/1917                Tyne Cot Memorial          

Cpl F Sentance               9827                  Sherwood Foresters           31/03/1915                Cite Bonjean Armentieres        

Pte C E Bailey                3735                  Sherwood Foresters           03/09/1916                Thiepval Memorial          

Pte G Hempshall            13191                 Sherwood Foresters           09/08/1915                Helles Memorial Turkey     

Pte G Simpson                                         Yorks & Lancasters            03/03/1919                St. Swithun’s Long Bennington    

Pte H Spicer                  48822                Worcestershire Regiment     09/09/1918                Hamburg Cemetery           

Cpl T Martin                 26054                 Royal Army Medical Corp  29/10/1917                Mendinghem Military Cemetery       

Cpl J Foster                  20837                  Machine Gun Corp             22/03/1918               Arras Memorial     

Tr T W Cragg               275599               WorcesterYeomanry           10/03/1919               Alexandria War Memorial Cemetery           

Cpl W Rance                19018                 Royal FieldArtillery              02/12/1917               Cambrai Memorial Louveral           

Cpl J Whittaker             173696               Royal Field Artillery             20/09/1918               Chocques Military Cemetery         

Pte J W Burrows           12724                 Royal Fusiliers                     21/12/1917               Hamburg Cemetery           

Pte J W Bennett            14797                 Lincolnshire                         02/12/1917                Perth Cemetery (China Wall)       

Csm C C Chalk             11669                Lincolnshire                          26/09/1915                Loos Memorial      

Sgt C H Cutts                 7635                 Lincolnshire                          15/11/1914                Menin Gate         

Pte G W Cutts               13267                Lincolnshire                          09/08/1915                Helles Memorial Turkey     

Pte A Kirton                  13047                Lincolnshire                          28/07/1915                Lancashire Landing, Turkey         

Pte J W Norman            242373              Lincolnshire                          19/06/1917                Arras Memorial     

Pte J Wilkinson

Whilst researching the Long Bennington War Memorial, the following five casualties were discovered who had been born in Long Bennington, but did not live in the village at the out-break of the First World War.

NAME                     SERVICE No.         REGIMENT                 DATE OFDEATH     CEMETERY           

Pte G E Bellamy             43051                 South Staffordshire               23/04/1917              Arras Memorial     

Pte S Busby                   14383                  Leicestershire                       01/10/1917              Tyne Cot Memorial          

Pte C Hedworth             52481                  Lincolnshire                         20/10/1918              Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery      

Gnr W Walker               309141                Royal Garrison Artillery        20/06/1917              Ferme-Olivier Cemetery     

Pte F Wilkinson              34113   King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry   01/04/1917             Savy British Cemetery   

 

There are four names on the Roll of Honour in Saint Within's Church which do not appear on the War Memorial, they are:  

Lance-Corporal James Cope

Private John Doughty

Corporal Pery Archibald Rawding

Private John William Smith

 

 

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Gunner WILLIAM RANCE  19018 Royal Field Artillery “C” Battery 181st Brigade who died on 2nd December 1917 Son of Mrs Henshaw Church Street, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.                                           

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Co. Sergeant Major CHRISTOPHER CHARLES CHALK  11669 Lincolnshire Regiment, “B” Company 8th Battalion who died age 29 on 26th September 1915. Son of Charles and Amy Chalk; husband of Edith Alice Chalk, Church Street, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (20th November 1915)

 

OUR HEROES. Co.-Sergt.-Major CHALK of Long Bennington

Mrs. Chalk of Long Bennington, has been informed that her son, Co.-Sergt.-Major Chalk “B” Company, 8th Lincolns has been reported (unofficially) as wounded and missing, since the battle of Loos.  Mrs. Chalk would be grateful for any news concerning her son, and would be pleased to hear from any of his comrades who saw him after he was wounded.

Newark Herald (4th December 1915)

LONG BENNINGTON

MISSING – Since the severe fighting at Loos, more than two months ago, no authentic news has been received of Company-Sergeant-Major Chris. C. Chalk, of the 8th Lincolns, whose home is at Long Bennington and who is known to have been engaged in the great advance which then took place.  Various enquiries have been instituted, and from unofficial sources news has reached his anxious relatives to the effect that when the 8th Lincolns were obliged to withdraw from a position which had become untenable, Sergt.-Major Chalk was observed to fall down wounded but managed to get up again, and appeared to be making his way to rejoin his Company.  An enquiry addressed to the War Office a month or so ago elicited the reply that Sergt.-Major Chalk’s name had not been received in any casualty list, and that so far as the authorities knew he was still serving with his regiment.  However, on Monday last his name was published amongst the “missing”.  His relatives and friends are still not without hope that he may have been picked up by one of the enemy ambulance parties, in which case there is yet a chance of the hearing something of, or from him before long.

(Long Bennington census 1901 pages 23/24)

Christopher Chalk lived on Church Street, Long Bennington, with his father Charles and mother Amy.  He had a brother Frank age 11, and a sister Hester age 4. Christopher was age 14.

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Corporal FRED SENTANCE 9827 Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment) 2nd Battalion who died age 27 on 31st March 1915. Brother of Mrs C Sewards, Bennington Fields, Cotham,  Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Newark Herald (24th April 1915) and Newark Advertiser (28th April 1915)

COTHAM SOLDIER KILLED

Mrs. C. Sewards, Bennington Fields, Cotham, Newark, has received intimation from the War Office, that her brother, Corpl. Sentance, who resided with her, had died of wounds in France.  Last week Mrs. Sewards received the following letter from Lieut. W.A.W. Crellin, of Corpl. Sentance’s Regiment, the 2nd Sherwood Foresters.

“Dear Madam: Whilst censoring the letters this afternoon I noticed a field postcard addressed to you by Corpl. Sentance, who belongs to my Company.  I very much regret to have to inform you that he was hit in the head by a German sniper at about 12.30 p.m. today.  It is a very nasty wound, and he is still unconscious (4 p.m.).  His wound has been properly dressed by the doctor, and everything has been done to make him as comfortable as possible.  I am very much afraid that he has not much chance of pulling through, though we all sincerely hope he will, as he is such a fine fellow and a most excellent soldier, who has never known what fear is.  We could well do with many more like him; no work was too hard or too dangerous for him.”

Corpl. Sentance was seven years in India and was a reservist when the war broke out.  He was only 27 years of age.

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 Corporal PERCY ARCHIBALD RAWDING 174832 Royal Garrison Artillery 88th Siege Battery who died age 23 on 27th April 1918. Son of William and Jane Rawding, Brant Broughton, Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Newark Herald (15th June 1918)

CORPL. P. RAWDING, BRANT BROUGHTON

Another brave lad from this village has made the great sacrifice in this terrible war.  Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rawding have been notified by the War Office that their son, Percy, was killed instantaneously by a German shell on April 27th in France.  He was a fine young fellow, and a universal favourite.  Before the war he worked for Mr. McKears, at Long Bennington, having previously served his apprenticeship with Messrs. Coldron and Son, of Brant Broughton.  He enlisted in the Lincolnshire Yeomanry, but after being made a corporal he was transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery.  Several of his comrades have written to his parents saying how much they shall miss their pal, and the Chaplain’s letter states he was much beloved by his comrades and respected by his officers.  Mr. and Mrs. Rawding have still three sons engaged in the war – one, Harry, is now a prisoner in Germany.  The youngest, Albert, is in the fighting line in France; and their eldest, William, has just come home on furlough.  He was on board the ill-fated Mercian, and since then has been continuously engaged in action in Egypt and Palestine, and more recently “somewhere in France.”

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Gunner JACK WHITTAKER 173696 Royal Field Artillery X/9th Trench Mortar Battery who died age 20 on 20th September 1918. Son of Alfred and Sarah Whittaker, Main Road, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (5th October 1918)

Gunner JACK WHITTAKER of Long Bennington

Mr. And Mrs. A. Whittaker have received the sad news that their only son, Jack, was killed in action on September 20th.Captain Todd writes:- “In the Field, B.E.F., France, Sept. 23rd, 1918. Dear Mr Whittaker, It is with the deepest regret that I write to inform you that your son No. 173696, Gunner J. Whittaker, was killed in action on Sept. 20th.  I can fully realise what a severe blow this news will be to you, and I trust that you and your family will accept the most sincere sympathy of all officers and men of the Battery.  We are all conscious of a great sense of loss, for your son was a general favourite, and beloved by all his comrades.  He was a fine type of young Englishman, and a good soldier.  That he died fighting in his country’s  cause will surely offer great cause for pride, and some relief to the sorrow which I am sure you must feel.  I was not three yards away from him when he fell; he was killed instantaneously, and could have suffered no pain.  He was buried the following day, at Choques Military Cemetery, all the men of the Battery who were not required for duty attending the service at their own request.  I cannot close without once again saying how greatly I, personally, appreciated your son’s high qualities, and assuring you of my sincerest sympathy.  I remain, sincerely yours, Herbert W. Todd, Captain R.F.A. Commanding Trench Mortar Battery.” Gunner J. Whittaker was only 20 years of age, and enlisted in the R.F.A. in September 1916.  After training, he went with his regiment to France on December 26th 1916.  He was wounded in the thigh at Passchendaele, in October 1917, and was invalided to England, rejoining in May 1918.  Of a quiet and unassuming disposition, he generally beloved, and will be sadly missed.  The deepest sympathy of the whole village goes out to his sorrowing parents and family in their bereavement.  A memorial service will be held at Long Bennington Parish Church on Sunday, Otc.13th at 11 am.

Newark Advertiser (9th October 1918)

GUNNER J. W. WHITTAKER, LONG BENNINGTON

Mr. And Mrs. A. Whittaker, of the Royal Oak Inn, received word on Friday week that their only son, Gunner Jack Whittaker, of the R.F.A. had been killed in action on the 20th Sept.  The sad news was conveyed to the family in a sympathetic letter written by the Captain of deceased’s Company, who was close to him when he fell.  In the letter he speaks very highly of the esteem in which the young soldier was held by his officers and his comrades, and at the general regret felt at his death.  The deceased, who was only 20 years of age, enlisted in September, 1916 and was trained at Athlone, in Ireland.  He was drafted to France in December of the same year, and was wounded in the fighting at Passchendale in October, 1917.  He was last home on leave in May of the present year.  Much sympathy is felt for the members of the family in their irreparable loss.

Newark Herald (5th October 1918)

GUNNER  J. W. WHITTAKER, LONG BENNINGTON.

Last Friday morning Mr. and Mrs. A. Whittaker, of the Royal Oak Inn, received word that their only son, Gunner Jack Whittaker, of the R.F.A., had been killed in action on the 20th Sept.  The sad news was conveyed to the family in a sympathetic letter written by the Captain of the deceased’s Company, who was close to him when he fell.  In the letter he speaks very highly of the esteem in which the young soldier was held by his officers and comrades, and at the general regret felt at his death.  The deceased, who was only 20 years of age, enlisted in September, 1916, and was trained at Athlone, in Ireland.  He was drafted to France in December of the same year, and was wounded in the fighting at Passchendale in October, 1917.  He was last home on leave in May of the present year.  Much sympathy is felt for the members of the family in their irreparable loss.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 18)

Jack Whittaker lived with his father Alfred and mother Sarah at The Reindeer Inn, Main Road, Long Bennington.  He had two sisters, Eva age 5 and Annie age 4 months.  Jack was age 3.

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Gunner WALTER WALKER 309141 Royal Garrison Artillery 2nd/1st Lancs. Heavy Battery who died age 35 on 20th June 1917. Son of William and Elizabeth Walker, 42 Manvers Avenue, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham.

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Lance-Corporal JOHN FOSTER 20837 Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) 6th Battalion who died age 24 on 22nd March 1918. Son of John and Elizabeth Foster, Welborns Lane, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Newark Herald (27th November 1915)

HOME FROM THE TRENCHES – Private John Foster, of the 2nd Sherwoods, was home last weekend on six days’ leave after having been at the front exactly a twelvemonth.  He left the first line of trenches at Ypres (where he has been since May) on Thursday morning at five o’clock, and landed at Folkestone from Boulogne, on Friday morning, reaching Long Bennington later in the day.  Private Foster joined the Army a year ago last February, and had had five month’s training when war broke out.  His experiences of fighting include the battles at Armentieries, La Bassee, and Hooge amongst others, and up to the present he has escaped injury, although he was buried along with six others in one of the trenches at Hooge, and for a time was reported as missing.  He is now in one of the machine-gun sections, and the men of his company are occupying some trenches which were taken from the Germans in August.  Of the five hundred men who formed the draft with which he proceeded to the front a year ago, there are, it appears, not more than thirty or forty now remaining.  Private Foster has been wonderfully well the whole of the time he has been abroad.  His many friends at Long Bennington gave him a hearty welcome.  He returned to the front on Wednesday, taking with him the best wishes for his continued immunity from the many dangers to which he is naturally exposed.

Grantham Journal (18th November 1916)

WAR NOTES:- In the course of an interesting letter to our correspondent, Pte. J. Foster, of The Machine Gun Corps, writes:-“All the trenches we are holding have been captured from the Germans.  Just a word about these German dugouts, or shelters.  They go down about twenty or thirty feet, all boarded in, and steps leading right down to the bottom, just like cabins on board ship.  One of them would easily hold a couple of hundred men.  They have telephones down, and were obviously used to shelter their infantry during our bombardments, as they are the only things that have not been completely smashed to atoms by our very effective shells.  Practically every square yard of ground up there for miles around has been tossed up by shell fire, over and over again, I should say, as, when we get in the Germans’ positions, they turn their own guns on us and shell it over again.  I could not describe to you exactly what it looks like-simply a large barren waste of country, with stumps of trees sticking up here and there, which were once woods and fields.  We had a novel way of cooking our dinner in the trenches, as, of course, we could not make a fire, as the smoke would give our position away.  We got an old tin, put little slices of candle in with some cloth, and, when mixed together and lit, you can boil a pint of water in about an hour.  We get plenty of sniping at the Germans, as they often get out of the trenches at night time, and we had to keep constantly on the watch for them, as they were only 40 or 50 yards from us at one point of their line.  Our line up there is all zig-zag, as we keep getting a bit of the Germans’ at a time, and it is extremely hard to tell which are our trenches and theirs in places, as they practically run into each other. The R.A.M.C. stretcher-bearers do some splendid work up there, and it is a very hard job getting wounded out of those narrow trenches”.

Grantham Journal (16th February 1918)

WAR NOTES – Lance-Corpl. J. Foster, M.G.C., wearing the red and three blue chevrons for overseas service, has been home on fourteen days’ leave.  In December last, he was recommended for the D.C.M., but, as his Commanding Officer was wounded, this was, unfortunately, too late.  Brigadier-General Crawford, however, sent him a parchment Certificate bearing the following inscription:- “No. 20837 Pte. Foster M.G.C.  Your gallant conduct in the Field on the 6th December, 1917, near Cambrai, in rendering aid to wounded comrades under heavy fire has been reported to me, and I have had much pleasure in sending you the record of your gallantry.”  Since then, the gallant soldier has been promoted in the field to the rank of Lance-Corpl. for further acts of bravery.  Pte. W. Foster, Northumberland Fusiliers, has been granted a short furlough to meet his brother.

Grantham Journal (13th April 1918)

Lance-Corpl. J. W. FOSTER of Long Bennington

Mr. and Mrs. W. Foster, of Long Bennington, have received the distressing news that their son, Lance-Corpl. John W. Foster, M.G.C. was killed in action on March 22nd, and their sorrow is shared by the whole village.  Of a happy, buoyant disposition. “Jack” made friends everywhere, and his cheery presence will be sadly missed.  The news was conveyed in the following letter from his officer:-

Dear Mrs. Foster,-I am writing this trusting that you have already been informed, and that I am not the first to inform you, of the sad news of the death of your son.  He fell on the second day of the recent battle, and his death was instantaneous.  I am writing, having been his section officer for the past ten months and knowing him intimately.  He was a lad I always trusted, a quiet, courageous, and efficient soldier, and we, officers and men alike of this Company, mourn with you over the loss you have sustained, and send our heartfelt sympathy to you in this your hour of trial and sorrow.  I, personally, shall miss little Jackie’s face in my section, and shall, as his officer, feel his absence keenly.  We were all proud of him, and his death creates such a gap in our ranks which will be very difficult to fill.  He died bravely facing the enemy and firing his gun as though he were merely on parade, and not in the midst of a big battle.  His courage and calmness were almost astounding in face of the death and destruction surrounding him on every hand.  Again extending condolence and sympathy of this Company to you in your great loss, I remain, yours sincerely, Ernest J. Patmore, Second-Lieutenant.

The deceased soldier was 24 years of age, and enlisted in the Sherwood Foresters a few months before the war.  He was sent to the Western Front at the beginning of hostilities, was present at the battle of Mons, and taken part in most of the fighting since, including Cambrai battle.  In December last, he was recommended for the D.C.M. “for rendering aid to wounded comrades under heavy fire,” and later was promoted Lance-Corporal.  A memorial service will be held in the Parish Church to-morrow, (Sunday 24th inst.).

Newark Advertiser (17th April 1918)

LANCE-CORPL. J. FOSTER, NEWARK

Mr. And Mrs. Wm. Foster, formerly of Long Bennington, and now of Depot-yard, Newark have received the sad intelligence that their second son, Lance-Corp. John Foster, M.G.C. 23 years of age, has been killed.  His Commanding Officer wrote that he fell on the second day of the recent battle, and his death was instantaneous.  He was a lad who was always trusted, a quiet, courageous, and efficient soldier.  He died bravely facing the enemy and firing his gun.  Lance-Corpl. Foster was a native of Long Bennington, and was a bricklayer by trade.  He had been in the Army previous to 1914, and re-enlisted into the Sherwood Foresters as soon as war broke out, being subsequently transferred to the M.G.C.  He was fond of football, and in this connection was well known at Grantham and Newark and the district around.

Newark Herald (20th April 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR CASUALTIES – The recent heavy fighting on the western front has caused the men from this village to again figure in the casualty lists.  It is with much regret that the death of Lance-Corporal John W. Foster, of the M.G.C. has to be recorded, news reaching his relatives a few days ago to the effect that he was instantaneously killed on the 22nd of last month whilst gallantly taking his part in trying to stem the German onslaught.  His officer pays a high tribute to his bravery.

(Long Bennington census 1901 page 12/13)

John Foster lived on Welborns Lane, Long Bennington, with his father John W. and mother Elizabeth A.  He had four sisters, Mary age 15, Gertrude age 9, Ethel age 3, and Kate age 6 months.  He also had one brother, William age 2.  John was age 7.

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Lance-Corporal TOM MARTIN 26054 Royal Army Medical Corps 56th Field Ambulance who died age 35 on 29th October 1917. Husband of Gertrude Clements (formerly Martin), Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (10th November 1917)

Corpl. TOM MARTIN of Long Bennington

The sad news has been received that Corpl. Tom Martin, R.A.M.C., officially reported gassed, and seriously wounded in the knee, has succumbed to his injuries in hospital abroad, at the age of 35 years.  He joined the R.A.M.C. at the beginning of the war, and was trained at Belton Park.  Drafted abroad Nov. 1915, he received shrapnel wounds in the thigh July 19th 1916, and was in hospital for some time.  The sympathy of the village of Long Bennington goes out to his widow and three little children, left to mourn his loss.  The following letter has been received by Mrs. Martin, from Lieut.-Col. K. O. Murchison, R.A.M.C. :- Dear Madam, I very much regret to have to inform you of the death of your husband, 26054, Corpl. T. Martin, R.A.M.C.  He was gassed whilst performing his duties with the stretcher bearers, and, although taken immediately to hospital behind the lines where everything possible was done for him, he succumbed to the effects of the poison.  On behalf of the officers, N.C.O.’s and men of this Field Ambulance, I tender the heartfelt sympathy of all in your bereavement.  Your husband was a good soldier, steady and faithful in the performance of his duties, and his loss is keenly felt by all his comrades. (Signed) K. O. Murchison, Lieut.-Colonel, R.A.M.C. Mrs. Martin has also received a letter of condolence from the Quartermaster and N.C.O.’s, Military Hospital, Belton Park, which she much appreciates.

Newark Herald (10th November 1917)

LONG BENNINGTON CASUALTIES.

The past few days has brought news of several casualties amongst the Long Bennington men serving on the western front.  The sympathies of all will be extended in the first place to Mrs. T. Martin and to Mr. and Mrs. Fenton, the former of  whom has lost her husband, and the latter their second son, Horace.  Corpl. Tom Martin joined the R.A.M.C. shortly after the war broke out, and was for some time stationed at Belton Park.  He went to France about two years ago, and was last home on leave in July of the present year.  News reached his wife a few days ago that he had been badly gassed and wounded in the knee, and on Thursday morning came the sad news that he had passed away.  Besides his widow he leaves three little children to mourn their loss.  Private Horace Fenton joined the Training Reserve last January, and was soon afterwards attached to the Staffordshire Regiment at Rugeley Camp.  He was last home on leave in July, and had only been at the front a few weeks when he was killed.  He was 19 years of age.  Driver Jack Whittaker, R.F.A., has been wounded in the leg and shoulder, and Private T. Bateman, of the Canadians has received wounds in the back and hand.  Pte. James Burrows of the Leicesters, is also reported wounded, but particulars of his injuries are not yet to hand. Pte. T. Allwood, of the Notts. and Derby Regiment who was wounded just recently has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry.  All who know him will congratulate him on this honour, and hope that he and the other wounded above-mentioned will soon recover.

Grantham Journal (24th November 1917)

LONG BENNINGTON

A MEMORIAL SERVICE for Corpl. T Martin, who died from wounds and gas poisoning on October 29th, was held in the Parish Church on Sunday.  A special Psalm, xxxix, was chanted, appropriate hymns sung, and an impressive sermon preached by the Vicar, the Rev. W. Foster Smith, from Hebrews xi, 13.  There was a large congregation.

Grantham Journal (25th October  1919)

AN INTERESTING WEDDING was solomnised in the Parish Church, on Thursday week, between Mr. Hubert Clements (widower), and Mrs. Gertrude Martin (widow), both of Long Bennington.  The Vicar, the Rev. W. Foster Smith, officiated.  The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. L. King of Leadenham, and her attendant was Mrs. G. H. Kirton.  The bride’s two little daughters were also in attendance.  Mr. Arthur Charity was best man.  A reception was held at Belle Vue House, kindly lent by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Kirton.  The happy pair were the recipients of many useful presents, including an umbrella and handbag from the Women’s Institute (of which the bride is a member), and the bridegroom from his fellow workmen, a tablecloth and set of carvers.

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Lance Corporal JAMES COPE 305813 Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) 2nd/8th Battalion who died age 23 on 7th April 1917. Son of Mr. H. G. Cope, Wright Street, Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Newark Advertiser (25th April 1917)

THIRD BROTHER KILLED

The sorrow caused by the toll of the young life of the country which is being taken by this devastating war is sufficiently poignant when an irreparable gap is made in any family circle, but in some cases the sorrow is intensified by treble bereavement.  With great regret is recorded this week the third great sorrow experienced by Mr. H. G. Cope, of 19, Wright-street, Newark, and formerly of Cotham Station, by the death of the last of his three sons, killed in action.  The third one to lose his life is Lance-Corporal J. Cope, Sherwood Foresters, whose twin brother was killed at Loos on Sept. 25th, 1915, and whose other brother was killed on January 24th during the “big push.”  He was 23 years of age, and for four years was in the employ of Mr. Ablewhite, Long Bennington, and was killed in France on April 7th, 1917.

Mr. Cope has received the following letter from the chaplain:- “I am very sorry to tell you that your son, Lance-Corpl. J. Cope, was killed in action in the early hours of Saturday, April 7th.  I should like to express my deep sympathy with you in your loss.  At the same time I know you will be very proud that he met his death in so fine a way.  I buried him where he fell with some of his comrades on Tuesday last.  He is exceedingly highly spoken of by both officers and men, and is generally missed.  May God bless and comfort you and grant him rest.”

Much sympathy is felt for Mr. Cope in his sad loss of all three of his sons.

Newark Herald (28th April 1917)

OUR HONOURED DEAD. SAD NEWARK CASE.

With much regret is recorded this week the third great loss experienced by Mr. H. G. Cope, of 19 Wright-street, Newark, and formerly of Cotham Station, by the death of the last of his three sons, killed in action.  The third one to lose his life is Lance-Corpl. J. Cope, Sherwood Foresters, whose twin brother was killed at Loos on Sept. 25th, 1915, and whose other brother was killed on January 24th during the “big push.”  He was 23 years of age, and for four years was in the employ of Mr. Ablewhite, Long Bennington, and was killed in France on April 7th, 1917.

Mr. Cope has received the following letter from the Chaplain:- “I am very sorry to tell you that your son, Lance-Corpl. J. Cope was killed in action in the early hours of Saturday, April 7th.  I should like to express my deep sympathy with you in your loss.  At the same time I know you will be proud that he met his death in so fine a way.  I buried him where he fell with some of his comrades on Tuesday last.  He is exceedingly highly spoken of by both officers and men, and is generally missed.  May God bless and comfort you and grant him rest.”

Much sympathy is felt for Mr. Cope in the sad loss of all three of his sons.

Lance Corporal James Cope was killed in action when in the attack on the village of Le Verguier, France.

(Information supplied by the Sherwood Foresters Regimental Historian).

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Private ARTHUR KIRTON 13047 Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Battalion who died age 23 on 28th July 1915. Son of Charles Kirton Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Newark Advertiser (25th August 1915)

LONG BENNINGTON

A DARDANELLES CASUALTY:- News from the War Office reached Mr. Charles Kirton, on Thursday morning, to the effect that his youngest son, Private Arthur Kirton, of the 6th Lincolns, died at the Dardanelles on July 28th, from wounds received in action at a place not known.  Private A. Kirton, who was 23 years of age, was born at Long Bennington, and up to the date of his enlistment last September, had lived his life there.  His training took place at Belton Park, near Grantham, and at Farnham, in Surrey.  He was home on short leave two months ago, and sailed for the Dardanelles shortly afterwards.  A card bearing date July 26th received from him only a day or two before the official notification of his death, stated that he had then been a week in the trenches and was still all right.  Much sympathy is felt locally for his father and the other members of the family, but in their loss they have the satisfaction of knowing that he has given his life for the sake of his country.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 10)

Arthur Kirton lived on Back Lane, Long Bennington, with his father Charles and mother Jane.  He had three brothers, John age 23, William age 19, Charles age 11, and a sister age 9.  Arthur was age 7.

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Private CHARLES EDWIN BAILEY 3735 Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment) 16th Battalion who died age 22 on 3rd September 1916. Son of George and Ruth Bailey, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (30th September 1916)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR NOTES – Bombardier Harold Bailey, R.F.A., has been home on leave.  After seeing active service, he was drafted to Salonika, where he had rheumatic fever, was invalided to Egypt, and is now on home service.  Mr and Mrs. G. Bailey have five sons, and a son-in-law, in the Army, viz. Albert, a Corporal in the R.E.; John, a Corporal in the A.S.C.; Harold, a Bombardier, R.F.A., George and Charles, the Leicesters and Sherwood Foresters respectively, and Sergeant Lowe, son-in-law in the York and Lancasters.

Private C. E. Bailey joined the Battalion on 16th February 1915 and served with “A” company.  He was killed in action when in the attack near Beaumont Hamel, France. (Information supplied by the Sherwood Foresters Regimental Historian).

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 9)

Charles Bailey lived at Gipsy Hall, Long Bennington with his father George and mother Ruth.  He had two brothers, John age 10, Harold age 8, and two sisters Eliza age 12, and Dorothy age 3.  Charles was age 6.

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Private CHARLES HEDWORTH 52481 Lincolnshire Regiment 7th Battalion who died age 19 on 20th October 1918. Son of George William and Sarah Oswin Hedworth, Normanton-on-Cliff.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 4)

Charles Hedworth lived with his father George and mother Sarah at Binghams Building, Long Bennington.  He had two brothers, Cecil age 6 and Hedley age 5.  Charles was age 2.

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Private FREDERICK WILKINSON 34113 King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry 2nd Battalion who died age 37 on 1st April 1917. Husband of Edith J. Wilkinson, Marr, Doncaster.

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Private GEORGE EDWARD BELLAMY 43051 South Staffordshire Regiment 8th Battalion who died age 21 on 23rd April 1917. Son of Richard and Mary Ann Bellamy, Westborough Holmes, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

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Private GEORGE HEMPSHALL 13191 Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) 9th Battalion who died age 26 on 9th August 1915. Husband of Mrs Hempshall, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (12th February 1916)

Pte. Geo. HEMPSHALL of Long Bennington

Much sympathy will be felt for Mrs. Hempshall, Foston, at the death of her husband, Pte. Geo. Hempshall, of the 9th Sherwood Foresters, the sad event taking place on August 9th at Gallipoli.  Pte. Geo. Hempshall was a native of Foston, and had lived there the greater part of his life.  He was the first to enlist out of forty in that village as soon as the war commenced, and received his training at Belton Park and Frencham, Surrey.  Although killed in action so long ago, it was only on Monday that Mrs. Hempshall received news from the War Office concerning her husband’s death.

Newark Herald (12th February 1916)

ONE OF THE FALLEN – The death of another Long Bennington soldier has been officially recorded within the last few days.  This is Pte. Geo. Hempshall, of the 9th Sherwood Foresters, whose name appears in the official list of killed on Wednesday last (Feb. 9th).  Pte. Hempshall was one of the first to enlist from this village as soon as the war commenced, and received his training at Belton Park and Frensham, Surrey.  He formed one of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, and his death is scheduled as having taken place on August 9th last at Gallipoli.  It was only last week, however, that Mrs. Hempshall received news from the War Office concerning her husband’s death.  Pte. Hempshall was only married just previous to his departure for Gallipoli, and much sympathy is felt for the young widow.

Grantham Journal (May 1916)

LONG BENNINGTON

Pte. GEO. HEMPSHALL – Mrs. Hempshall, whose husband was killed in action in August last, has this week received a communication from the Commanding Officer stating how he met with his death.  The letter ran as follows:- “During the action on August 9th, your husband was assisting in carrying a wounded man, when he was shot through the head, and death was instantaneous.  Those of his comrades who are still with the battalion speak very highly of the plucky work done by your husband on that day”.

Pte. Hempshall it will be remembered, was one of the first men in the village to enlist, and joined the 9th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, which unit formed part of the 11th Division, recently encamped at Belton.

Private George Hempshall was killed in action in the attack at Ismail Oglu Tepe, (Chocolate Hill), Gallipoli. (Information supplied by the Sherwood Foresters Regimental Historian)

(Long Bennington census 1901 page 2)

George Hempshall lived on Costa Row, Long Bennington, with his father George.  He had one sister Emma, age 16.   George was age 12.

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Private GEORGE SIMPSON 18431 Labour Corps formerly 30151 York & Lancaster Regiment Labour Battalion who died age 40 on 3rd March 1919. Husband of Mrs. Mary Jane Simpson, Church Street, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (15th March 1919)

LONG BENNINGTON

ROLL OF HONOUR – The sympathy of the village goes out to Mrs. G. Simpson, whose husband, Pte. George Simpson, York and Lancs. Regt. (Labour Batt.), succumbed to pneumonia, following influenza, contracted while on active service in France.  He was admitted to the Royal Herbert Hospital, Woolwich, on Dec. 5th, 1918, where he underwent two operations, but the best medical skill and attention proved of no avail, and he passed away on March 3rd, 1919 – sad to say, before his wife, who had been summoned by telegram, could reach the institution.  He was laid to rest in the village Churchyard, Long Bennington, on Monday, the last, sad rites being impressively performed by the Vicar, the Rev. W. Foster Smith.

Newark Herald (15th March 1919)

FUNERAL OF PRIVATE G. SIMPSON – On Monday afternoon the remains of Private George Simpson, of the York and Lancashire Regiment, who died in the Royal Herbert Hospital, Woolwich, on Shrove Tuesday, were laid to rest in the village churchyard.  The deceased joined up on August 1st, 1916, and after his training, was sent to France, where he was for about two years, returning to England in November last, on account of illness.  From the first his case was considered a very serious one, and for some time past he has been in a critical condition, with little chance of recovery.  The deceased soldier was only 40 years of age, and before joining the army was engaged as waggoner with the late Mr. G. H. Ross, of Moor Farm, Stubton.  Much sympathy is felt for the widow and children.

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Private GEORGE WILLIAM CUTTS 13267 Lincolnshire Regiment 6th Battalion who died age 24 on 9th August 1915. Son of Ruth Dolby (formerly Cutts) and the late Richard Cutts, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (29th January 1916)

LONG BENNINGTON

A PATRIOTIC FAMILY – Two sons of Mrs. T. Dolby, of this village, are serving their King and country, viz., Rifleman J. S. Cutts, of the King’s  Royal Rifles, and Pte. G. W. Cutts, of the 6th Lincolns.  Last week, Mrs. Dolby had a surprise visit from her son, Rifleman J. S. Cutts, who, after having been out to France for some seven months, came home for a few days rest.  He has since returned.  He was looking particularly well, and had many interesting stories to relate.  The other son, Pte. G. W. Cutts, who underwent his training at Belton Park, left with his regiment on Easter Monday, and has, we regret to learn, been posted as wounded and missing at the Dardanelles since August 9th.  Another son, Sergt. C. H. Cutts, of the 2nd Lincolns unfortunately, died of wounds received in action in France on November 15th, 1914.

Grantham Journal (3rd June 1916)

O U R   H E R O E S

THREE LONG BENNINGTON BROTHERS

                  Pte. G.W. Cutts.      Rfm. J.S.Cutts.      Sergt. C.H.Cutts.

The photographs reproduced [see link below] are of three Long Bennington brothers, sons of Mrs. T. Dolby, Row Farm, Long Bennington.  Pte. G. W. Cutts, who is in the 6th Lincolns, and trained at Belton Park, has been missing since August 9th, 1915;  Rifleman  J. S. Cutts, of the King’s Royal Rifles, is at present suffering from shell shock at a London Hospital;  whilst Sergt. C. H. Cutts, of the 2nd Lincolns, died of wounds received in action on November 15th, 1914.  The greatest sympathy is felt for Mrs. Dolby in her sad trouble, and the hope is expressed on all sides that not only her Rifleman son will speedily recover, but that good news may even yet be received of her boy from Gallipoli.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 1)

George William Cutts lived with his mother Ruth Dolby and stepfather Thomas Dolby at Row Farm, Long Bennington.  He had a brother Leonard Cutts age 2 years, stepbrothers Thomas age 16, William age 11, John age 9, George age 6, Albert age 4, Joseph age 6 months, and stepsisters Florence age 13, and Emma age 8. George William was age 9. (His two other brothers J. S. Cutts and C. H. Cutts did not live in Long Bennington in 1901)  

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Private HERBERT SPICER 48822 Worcestershire Regiment 2nd Battalion who died age 26 on 9th September 1918. Son of Thomas and Rebecca Spicer, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire. Husband of Mrs. E. Spicer, 9, Spittal Row, Northgate, Nottinghamshire.

Grantham Journal (4th January 1919)

Pte. HERBERT SPICER, of Long Bennington.

Yet another village hero has given his life for his country – Pte. Herbert Spicer, 2nd Worcestershire Regiment, fourth son of Thomas and Rebecca Spicer, Long Bennington, and grandson of Mr. Naaman Beeson.  A baker by trade, he was for some time employed by Mr. Allen, Long Bennington, and was a quiet and well-conducted young man.  He joined the Colours February 5th, 1916, was trained at Borden Camp, afterwards proceeding to France.  He was wounded in legs, hip, and thigh, and taken prisoner in April, 1918.  Official news has now been received to the effect that he died of wounds in Camp Hospital, Munster, Germany, on September 9th, 1918.  Deceased, who was 26 years of age, leaves a widow and one child, for whom, as well as for his parents, and other members of his family, the deepest sympathy is expressed.  Mr. Thomas Spicer has four surviving sons in the Army, Naaman, A.P.O., Walter, R.A.F., Aubrey, R.A.M.C., and Thomas, Notts and Derbys.

Newark Herald (28th December 1918)

OUR HONOURED DEAD

PTE. HERBERT SPICER, NEWARK

The death is reported of Pte. Herbert Spicer, 2nd Worcestershire Regt., at the age of 26.  He joined up at Newark on February 5th, 1916, and was trained at Borden Camp, afterwards proceeding to France.  He was wounded in the legs, hip and thigh, and taken prisoner about 17th April last.  In a letter received by his wife, deceased stated he was getting on nicely.  Official news has now been received from the War Office that Pte. Spicer died in Munster Camp, Germany, in hospital in September.  Deceased leaves a widow and one child.  Previous to going to the Army he was employed as a baker by Mr. Watkin, Kirkgate.  Deceased married a daughter of Mrs. Wm. Ives, Spital-row, three months before joining up.

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Private HORACE FENTON 45050 South Staffordshire Regiment 2nd/5th Battalion who died age 19 on 26th September 1917. Son of Joseph & Mary Fenton, Back Lane, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (10th November 1917)

Pte. H. FENTON of Long Bennington

We regret to report that the parents of Pte. Horace Fenton have been notified that their son was killed in action, on September 26th.  Pte. Fenton enlisted on January 24th 1917, and, after serving in the Training Reserve, was drafted to the Staffordshire Regiment.  He came home on leave in July last, before going abroad with his regiment.  He had only been a few weeks at the front, and was but nineteen years of age.  Very much sympathy is expressed for his sorrowing parents and relations.

Newark Advertiser (14th November 1917)

LONG BENNINGTON

The sympathies of all will be extended to Mr. And Mrs. Fenton who have lost their second son, Horace.  Pte. Horace Fenton joined the Training Reserve last January, and was soon afterwards attached to the Staffordshire Regiment at Rugeley Camp.  He was last home on leave in July, and had only been at the front a few weeks when he was killed.  He was 19 years of age.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 10)

Horace Fenton lived on Back Lane, Long Bennington, with his father Joseph and mother Mary.  He had two sisters, Kate age 8, Ethel age 4, and a younger brother Walter age 1.  Horace was age 3.

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Private J. W. SMITH  Despite extensive research the identity of J. W. Smith remains unknown.

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Private J WILKINSON  Despite extensive research the identity of Private J. Wilkinson remains unknown.

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Private JAMES BURROWS 32506 South Staffordshire Regiment who died age 26 on 6th October 1917. Son of John Burrows Church Street, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (5th January 1918)

Pte. JAMES BURROWS, of Long Bennington.

Mr. John Burrows, Long Bennington, father of Pte. James Burrows, South Staffords, has received official notice from the Record Office, Lichfield, that his son was killed in action on October 6th, 1917.  He had been previously reported wounded and missing.  On leaving School he was for some time in the employ of Mr. Allen, grocer and baker, who held him in high esteem.  He enlisted on the outbreak of the war, in the Leicesters, and about twelve months ago was invalided home suffering from shell shock.  On recovery, he was transferred to the South Staffords, with which regiment he returned to the front.  The sympathy of the whole village is extended to Mr. and Mrs. Burrows, who have thus lost their youngest son at the early age of 26 years.

Newark Advertiser (9th January 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR CASUALTIES – Two further casualties amongst the soldiers serving from this village have to be recorded this week-those of Gunner Wm. Rance, of the R.F.A., and Pte. James Burrows, of the South Staffords.  The former, whose mother, Mrs. Henshaw, lives in Church-street, enlisted on Sept. 6th, 1914, and was trained at Athlone and Fermoy, in Ireland.  He went abroad in February, 1916, and was killed in action on the 2nd of last month.  Pte. James Burrows, who was 26 years of age, was the son of Mr. John Burrows, of Church-street.  He enlisted shortly after the war broke out, and was reported missing on the 6th October last.  On Christmas Day morning official notice of his death was received by his father.  The sympathies of all who know them will be extended to the members of the bereaved families.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 23)

James lived on Church Street, Long Bennington with his father John Burrows and two sisters, Emma age 21, and Mary age 17.  James was age 9. (His older brother, Private John William Burrows, Royal Fusiliers, who was killed age 41, on 21st December 1917, and is buried in HAMBURG CEMETERY was not living in Long Bennington in 1901)

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Private JOHN DOUGHTY 27089 Royal Warwickshire Regiment 2nd Battalion who died age 32 on 31st May 1917. Son of Levi and Emma Doughty, Ropsley, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (16th June 1917)

Pte. JOHN DOUGHTY – LONG BENNINGTON

Pte. John Doughty has been accidentally killed while carrying out his duties as a member of the Salvage Corps abroad.  He was for six years assistant to Mr. W. H. Crabtree, grocer.  Always conscientious and trustworthy, he won the esteem of his employer, by whom his death is deeply deplored, and the respect of the village at large.

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Private JOHN WILLIAM BENNETT 14797 Lincolnshire Regiment 8th Battalion who died age 27 on 2nd December 1917. Husband of Sarah Jane Bennett, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire. Born at Bottesford, Nottingham.

Grantham Journal (15th December 1917)

Pte. J. W. BENNETT of Long Bennington

Another Long Bennington life has been laid down in the struggle for freedom – Pte. J. W. Bennett, R.E., aged 29 years.   The sad news was conveyed in the following sympathetic letter from his officer:- “Dear Madam, It is with the deepest regret that I have to break the sad news to you of the death of your husband, 14797 Pte. J. W. Bennett.  He was killed by a shell on the morning of Dec. 2nd, but I hope you will understand that he suffered no pain, as he was instantly killed.  I feel it my duty to break this sad news, as Pte. Bennett has been my servant for seven months, and had all that a servant and a soldier should possess.  If there is anything I can do, or give you any further information, I shall be very pleased to do so.  Trusting that this will be of some comfort to you in your great loss, and that you will please accept my deepest sympathy.  I am, your sympathising friend, F. C. Beales, Second-Lieut.”

Pte. J. W. Bennett joined the Lincolns, Jan 5th 1915, and, after training at Holton Camp, was drafted abroad in September 1916.  He saw much active service on the Western Front with his regiment, and in October last came home on leave.  On his return to the fighting line he was transferred to the Royal Engineers.  He leaves a widow and one child, to whom the sympathy of the village is extended.

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Private JOHN WILLIAM BURROWS 12724 Royal Fusiliers 8th Battalion who died age 41 on 21st December 1917. Son of John Burrows, Church Street, Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire. Husband of Annie L. Burrows, 127, London Street, Wanganui, New Zealand.

Grantham Journal (26th January 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR NOTES – Mr. John Burrows has heard from a private source that his elder son, Pte. John W. Burrows, Royal Fusiliers, is a prisoner of war in Germany.  He had previously been officially reported missing.  It transpires that he had been so severely wounded in the right foot that amputation was deemed necessary.  On leaving School he was apprenticed to Mr. C. Ablewhite, grocer, of this village.  When hostilities began he was holding a responsible position in a London grocery firm, but relinquished his post to join the colours.  His younger brother, Pte. James Burrows, South Staffordshire Regiment, was killed in action, October 6th, 1917.

Newark Herald (26th January 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON.

A PRISIONER OF WAR:- Mr. John Burrows, of Church Street, whose younger son was killed in action a short time ago, has now received news of his elder son, Private John W. Burrows, who was officially reported missing about Christmas time.  Private Burrows served his apprenticeship to the grocery business with Mr. C. Ablewhite, of this village, several years ago, and was living in London when war broke out.  He then joined the Royal Fusiliers.  No further official news has been received concerning him since he was reported missing, but last week his wife received a letter from a friend of the missing man saying that her husband was a prisoner of war at Soltau, in Hanover, and that he had had to have his right foot amputated.  This is not at all good news, but it has relieved the family of the suspense under which they have been living since the official report that he was missing reached them.

Grantham Journal (2nd February 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR NOTES – Mr. John Burrows’s elder son, Pte. John W. Burrows, Royal Fusiliers, who was wounded and a prisoner of war in Germany, succumbed to his wounds eight days after the amputation of his right foot.  The news came as a great shock to his relatives, as he was thought to be getting on well after the operation.  He was 41 years of age, and leaves a widow and three children.  The war has thus robbed Mr. Burrows of both his sons, the younger Pte. James Burrows, South Staffords, having been killed in action on Oct. 6th last. The sympathy of the whole village goes out to him and the family.

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 In 1923 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries, Hamburg was one of those chosen, and burials were brought into the cemetery from 120 burial grounds, including SOLTAU PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, Hanover, 25 burials of 1916-1918.

John William Burrows was the older brother of Private James Burrows, South Staffordshire Regiment, who died age 26 on 6th October 1917, and is buried in Menin Road South Military Cemetery.

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Private JOHN WILLIAM NORMAN 242373 Lincolnshire Regiment 1st/5th Battalion who died age 21 on 19th June 1917. Grandson of Mrs Smith Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (21st July 1917)

Pte. JOHN W. NORMAN of Long Bennington

Mrs. Norman has received official notice that her grandson, Pte. John Wm. Norman, of the Lincolns, has died of wounds received in action.  The deceased soldier joined the colours in July 1916, and after training at Saltfleet was drafted abroad the following November.  Before enlisting he was employed by Mr. C. Ablewhite, grocer, of Long Bennington.  He was only twenty-one years of age, of a quiet and unassuming disposition, and respected by all who knew him.  The deepest sympathy will be extended to the members of his family, and especially to his grandmother, who brought him up and who feels his loss very keenly.

Newark Herald (21st July 1917)

PTE. J. W. H. NORMAN, LONG BENNINGTON.

News was received last week to the effect that Private John W. H. Norman, of Long Bennington, had died of wounds, “somewhere in France,” on the 19th of June.  Pte. Norman, who was in the Lincolns, was 21 years of age.  He was last at home on leave in October, 1916, proceeding to France the following month.  Pte. Norman was a native of Balderton, but had lived at Long Bennington for several years, working during the latter part of the time for Mr. C. Ablewhite, grocer.  He is the second of Mr. Ablewhite’s employees to lose his life in the war.  Much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Smith, deceased’s grandmother, by whom he was brought up, and for his other relatives.

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Private SAMUEL BUSBY 14383 Leicestershire Regiment 9th Battalion who died age 24 on 1st October 1917. Son of Mrs Catherine Busby, 51 Redcross Street, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Grantham Journal (27th October 1917)

Private S. BUSBY, of Grantham.

Official notification has been received from the Record Office at Lichfield of the death of Pte. S. Busby, who was killed in action on Oct. 1st.  Prior to the war, Pte. Busby was employed as a boot maker at Messrs. Moore Bros., in Firkin-street.  He enlisted in the Leicestershire Regiment on Sept. 8th, 1914, and went abroad in July, 1915.  Last November he was home on leave, and only a few days before his parents (who reside at 51, Redcross-street) obtained news of his death, they received a letter from him saying he was looking forward to another leave shortly.  Pte. Busby was unmarried.  He had been wounded twice previously - in December, 1915, and October, 1916.

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Sergeant CHARLES HENRY CUTTS 7635 Lincolnshire Regiment 1st Battalion who died on 15th November 1914. Son of Ruth Dolby (formerly Cutts) and the late Richard Cutts,  Long Bennington, Grantham, Lincolnshire.

Newark Herald (5th December 1914)

LONG BENNINGTON

DIED OF WOUNDS – News has reached Long Bennington this week that Sergt. Charles Cutts, of the Lincoln Regiment, has died of wounds received in action.  His death, it is announced, occurred on the 15th of November, but no further particulars are yet to hand.  Sergt. Cutts, who was about 30 years of age, only went to the front at the beginning of November.  Much sympathy is felt for his mother and other relatives.  The combined parishes of Long Bennington and Foston have, during the present crisis, contributed between forty and fifty men to various branches of His Majesty’s forces, and, although some of them are know to be at the front, this is the first fatality that has been notified.

Grantham Journal (12th January 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR NOTES – Lance-Corpl. J. S. Cutts, K.R.R., has been home on fourteen days leave.  As he had been reported killed, his mother received a severe shock when he presented himself at the door.  Altogether he has been thirteen months in France, in 1916, he was invalided home suffering from shell shock, and on recovery returned to the fighting-line.  Subsequently reported unfit for trench life, he was set to guard German prisoners.  His brother, Pte. T. L. Cutts, has also been home on leave.  Mrs. Dolby has had four sons serving the colours, viz. Sergt. C. H. Cutts, died of wounds in France, Nov., 1914; Pte. G. W. Cutts, who fell at Gallipoli, August, 1915; and the two above mentioned.

Grantham Journal (29th June 1918)

LONG BENNINGTON

WAR NOTES – Mrs. T. Dolby has received the distressing news that her son, Pte. T. L. Cutts, Worcesters, was on May 28th, seriously wounded by gunshot in the neck.   He was taken to the U.S.A. General Hospital, at Rouen, and afterwards to Queen Mary’s Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancs., where in response to a wire from the military authorities, he has been visited by his mother.  Happily he appears to be making excellent progress.  Mrs. Dolby has had four sons in the war, two of whom have made the supreme sacrifice.

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Trooper THOMAS WILLIAM CRAGG 275599 Worcester Yeomanry 1st Battalion, Egyptian Expeditionary Force who died age 28 on 14th March 1919. Son of Joseph and Jane Cragg, Valley Cottage, Cotham,  Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Grantham Journal (29th March 1919)

OUR HEROES

Trooper T. W. CRAGG, of Long Bennington.

We regret to record the death of Trooper T. W. Cragg, No. 275599, 1st Worcester Yeomanry, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, who succumbed to small-pox, on March 14th 1919, at No. 21 General Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt.  A wave of sorrow passed over the village on the receipt of the sad news-his happy disposition had endeared him to all-and much sympathy is felt for his sorrowing parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cragg.  The deceased, who was 28 years of age, enlisted on November 11th, 1914, was trained at Retford, Swaffham, Brentwood, and Salisbury Plain, was drafted overseas in June, 1917, and saw active service in Egypt and Palestine.  In a letter to his parents, dated March 2nd, 1919, he said he was in excellent health, but on March 13th a cable was received that he was dangerously ill, and, later, the sad news came from the Record Office, York, that he had passed away on March 14th.  Before enlistment he was in the employ of Mr. C. Ablewhite, grocer, Long Bennington, who held him in highest esteem.  He is the third of Mr. Ablewhite’s assistants to make the supreme sacrifice.

(Long Bennington 1901 census page 5)

Tom Cragg lived on Asherton Hill with his father Joseph and mother Jane.  He had one sister, Annie age 14, and four brothers, John age 16, George age 12, Joseph age 6, and Robert age 2.  Tom was age 10.

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